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Emphysema

Emphysema

Emphysema is a long-term disease that affects the lungs. It is mostly caused by smoking and is thought to affect between 1-2 million people in the UK. The condition is a type of ‘chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD),’ in which lung tissue is progressively damaged, impairing gas exchange. There is no cure for the condition and the damage is irreversible. The best way to prevent progression of the disorder is to stop smoking, in combination with certain medical treatments and lifestyle modifications. Early diagnosis of the condition is crucial in preventing progression, so if you think you are experiencing symptoms associated with emphysema, please see your respiratory doctor or GP.

What are the symptoms of Emphysema?

The first symptom of emphysema is usually breathlessness, made worse during activity. In the early stages of the disease this may be minimal, but as the condition develops breathlessness can be overwhelming. Furthermore, you may begin to wheeze and experience a cough that produces yellow-grey mucus. Those suffering from the condition are also are a greater risk of chest infections.

What are the causes of Emphysema?

Many of the causes of emphysema can be avoided, including smoking and inhalation of smoke from other smokers (passive smoking). Other substances linked to emphysema development include dust and certain chemicals, including cadmium, isocyanates, and coal.

A small number of those affected may also have a rare predisposition to emphysema, known as alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is an enzyme made by the body that usually protects the lungs; those who are deficient of the enzyme are at a greater risk of developing emphysema.

How is Emphysema treated?

Treatment of emphysema aims to slow progression of the disease and ameliorate some of the symptoms. If you smoke, it is important to stop immediately to prevent rapid progression to late stage disease. In addition, inhalers may be useful. These deliver drugs such as bronchodilators to your lungs, allowing them to relax. In more severe disease, antibiotics and corticosteroids may be recommended. In late stage, severe disease, oxygen therapy may be required. This involves breathing in oxygen through nasal tubes for at least 15 hours each day, to stabilise oxygen levels in your blood.

Disclaimer

This article is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Doctify Limited has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but makes no warranty as to its accuracy. Consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. In the event of an emergency, please call 999 for immediate assistance.

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